Danvers State Hospital – An Abandoned Psychiatric Hospital in Massachusetts

Danvers State Hospital was a psychiatric hospital in Danvers, Massachusetts and opened in 1878 at a cost of $1.5 million. Danvers had previously been called Salem Village and was the site of the famous witch trials of 1690, the name having been changed to distance itself from the events of the past.

The facility was designed by Boston architect Nathaniel Jeremiah Bradlee. It was spread out over a large rural area and originally had two main buildings, the main one containing a number of wings which housed the patients with males on the west side and females on the east. The most extreme patients were housed at the end of the wings. Originally designed to house 500 patients, over 2000 ended up there at its peak.

Expansion of the facility occurred over time and included a gymnasium. The buildings were joined by underground tunnels and a power generating plant was located on site meaning the facility could be self-contained. The generator is still in operation to this day. The tunnels radiated in a spoke-like design from an area known as the hub. A research laboratory was opened in 1895 and rumours of inhumane experimentation on patients are still rife to this day.

The increase in use of medication to treat psychiatric patients meant that the number of people housed in Danvers State Hospital began to decrease and the first wards were closed in 1969. By 1992, the entire hospital was shut down and left abandoned. It was eventually demolished in 2006 to make way for apartments, despite some public objection to the demolition of what some deemed to be buildings of historic importance. The outer shell of the some of the old structures were retained as part of the new apartment complex. Strangely enough, while building the apartment complex buildings in 2007, a huge fire started under mysterious circumstances.

Location: Danvers, Massachusetts

Category: Hospital

Abandoned: 1992

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close